Japanese Scar Therapy uses non-insertive needles, called Teishins, to break up adhedsions and correct the flow around a scar. Pictured are some of the tools used during a treatment. From left to right: Copper Zanshin needle, Silver Teishin needle, Gold Teishin needle, jade Gua Sha tool, tiger roller and stick-on moxa.

Japanese Scar Therapy uses non-insertive needles, called Teishins, to break up adhedsions and correct the flow around a scar. Pictured are some of the tools used during a treatment. From left to right: Copper Zanshin needle, Silver Teishin needle, Gold Teishin needle, jade Gua Sha tool, tiger roller and stick-on moxa.

  • Problems arising after c-sections:
    Many women who have undergone a c- section report sensations of coldness or a lack of feeling above their scar. These same women may also report bowel and digestive issues and/or lower back pain.
  • Arm and shoulder impingement following breast cancer surgery:
    Japanese Scar Therapy used on a scar promptly after healing increases circulation to the area and decreases the formation of adhesions.
  • Pain and lack of mobility following arm, wrist, knee, ankle and foot surgery:  Many small scars seen insignificant but may effect the integrity of the associated joint and fascial train.
  • Pain and stiffness following back surgery:
    Many people report experiencing chronic pain and stiffness after back surgery. Addressing adhesions, correcting flow and increasing circulation offers great relief.
  • Problems arising after cosmetic surgery:
    Many women who have had a facelift often report with hip pain. Correcting the flow of Qi (energy / circulation) on the body’s lateral line of pull (gallbladder meridian) clears pain, stiffness and discomfort.  

 

Japanese Scar Therapy

In Oriental Medicine, it is understood that severe lacerations or cuts, to the body, disrupt the flow of Qi (circulation / energy) through the meridians (fascial trains / kinetic chains). The severing of a meridian and the resultant disruption to the flow of energy causes pain, numbness, pulling sensations and sensations of cold or heat.
If a meridian is severed due to an incision, laceration or cut, it often fails to re-join correctly during the healing phase. While it is easy to see visible scaring on the surface of the skin, we often fail to recognize what has occurred under the skin. Adhesions in the muscle, tissue and fascia, which naturally occur during the healing phase, often remain long after the healing phase and contribute to the issues mentioned above.
Japanese Scar Therapy specifically addresses the symptoms related to adhesions and incorrect flow within and around the scar. A series of gentle and non-invasive techniques are used to help break up adhesions, restore correct function to the area and soften the scar. A gold, silver or copper teishin (non-insertive needle) is used along the scar line, and margins, and is often accompanied by gentle cupping and moxibustion.